Reviews for The Baron's Men Performances

Review: Macbeth by The Baron's Men

Review: Macbeth by The Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on October 20, 2019

Forget the footnotes and study guides. MACBETH by the Baron's Men is honest, vigorous Shakespeare, and they'll keep you attentive and rooting for the good guys right to the end.

 

Yesterday a fellow translator, who works from German to English, confided to me, "I really didn't like Shakespeare in school. I finally took a course, with one of the university's leading professors, the last semester before he retired. I'm glad I did. But I still don't like Shakespeare. He's too hard to read."

 

How to respond to that comment? He wasn't seeking to be provocative; he was ...

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Review: The Curate Shakespeare As You Like It by The Baron's Men

Review: The Curate Shakespeare As You Like It by The Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on March 07, 2018

The contrast between Nigro's mischievous comedy about Shakespeare amateurs and the accomplished repertory of the Baron's Men reminds us what a sterling but unappreciated resource this company is for Austin arts.

Faced with a request to adapt Shakespeare's As You Like It for a reduced cast, playwright Don Nigro, known for his comedies, probably decided it could be done -- but it would be more fun to turn the whole thing inside out. After all, Shakespeare's script features twenty named characters -- twenty-one, actually, if you include the masque of Hymen, the god of marriage ceremonies. So that's what he did.

 

Nigro imagined an ...

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Review: As You Like It by Baron's Men

Review: As You Like It by Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 20, 2017

If you haven't made it out to the forest of Arden on the banks of the Colorado just twenty minutes from downtown, you should do penance. Or, better, get thee hence and hie thee thither. There's nothing remotely like it elsewhere in Central Texas.

The Baron's Men's staging of As You Like It is indeed just as Shakespeare aficionados like it. Of course there's the timbered Curtain Theatre, a tidy recreation of the half "O" of Elizabethan theatre, and there's the costume eye candy from Liegh Hegedus aided by Dawn Allee and her busy stitchery fairies. But more than anything there's the play itself, Shakespeare's whimsical tale of two aristocratic maidens running off ...

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Review: The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Baron's Men

Review: The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on October 17, 2016

The real mystery in the TRAGICAL HISTORY is Doctor Faustus' failure to repent. Casey Jones as a vivid Mephistopheles is more familiar and immediate than the distant God who could save Faustus.

You're in a Halloween sort of mood? Then the Baron's Men's production of Marlowe's The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus is for you.

 

The legend of the learned man who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in return for 24 years of worldly power and exhaltation is a deeply tragic tale, one that deftly symbolizes our perpetual longing for more in this present life -- more things, more scope and more experiences ...

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Review: The Lark  by Baron's Men

Review: The Lark by Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on May 11, 2016

Anouilh admonishes that you cannot explain Joan, any more than you can explain the tiniest flower growing by the wayside.

With a decade of public performances of Elizabethan and early modern theatre behind them, the Baron's Men offer an adroit and subtle change of mode at the lakeside Elizabethan-style Curtain Theatre. The Lark is a costume drama, richly draped, and it's set in 1430, the period exactly contemporaneous with the settings of Shakespeare's Henry VI plays. It shares a principal character with them: Joan of Arc, the maid of Orleans who rose ...

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Review: Richard III by Baron's Men

Review: Richard III by Baron's Men

by Michael Meigs
Published on April 19, 2016

Andy Bond's casual mastery of Shakespearian verse is a treat. His delivery as Richard III is strikingly low key and has the charm of apparent spontaneity.

The Baron's Men company in Austin got started as a lark in 1997, when a group of friends inspired by the Society for Creative Anachronism put together a twenty-minute version of Henry V. They went on to perform occasional Shakespeare on portable platforms until in 2005 tech magnate Richard Garriot offered to put up an Elizabethan-style stage on his waterfront property. He was serious about it. Construction was sturdy, and capacity of the two ...

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